Cognitive behavioral therapy reduces pain

by master on August 13, 2015

The vast majority of people with chronic pain rely on pain medications like prescription opioids for relief, but as the use of these drugs has increased, so has the incidence of serious problems including overdose, addiction and health complications. Often pain killers don’t improve a person’s ability to function well (because they feel too sedated) or their quality of life, which should be the main goal in treating pain.

Most pain experts advocate a more comprehensive approach to managing pain including exercise and what’s known as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

The vast majority of people with chronic pain rely on pain medications like prescription opioids for relief, but as the use of these drugs has increased, so has the incidence of serious problems including overdose, addiction and health complications. Often pain killers don’t improve a person’s ability to function well (because they feel too sedated) or their quality of life, which should be the main goal in treating pain.

Most pain experts advocate a more comprehensive approach to managing pain including exercise and what’s known as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

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